Guest Lecturers

Guest Lecturers on Board Aranui Cruises 2015
(Subject to Change without notice)

Voyage 1: January 10 – January 23, 2015
Yoan Bouit,

Voyage 2: January 31 – February 13, 2015

Voyage 3: February 21 – March 06, 2015
Mr. Michael Koch,
studied Oceanic Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Hamburg. He wrote his dissertation about life and changes in the Marquesas between 1925 and 1985. Michael spent one and a half years on the islands between 1985 and 1987. He learnt the language and visited all the islands. In 1995, he visited the islands with a German painter, Bernd Zimmer and prepared together an illustrated re-edition of Melville’s famous Typee. Michael works as an exhibition designer for various museums in Europe. He will tell about Polynesian European contact in the times since the Europeans coming to the islands as artists and scientists, colonials, missionaries, beachcombers, and other who visited the islands, livered there and created with their images, stories, letters and influence the myth of the islands.

Voyage 4: March 14 – March 27, 2015
Mr. Pierre Blanchard

Voyage 5: April 04 – April 17, 2015

Voyage 6: April 25 – May 08, 2015

Pascal Erhel & Sophie Duron, is a maritime lawyer for 13 years. She starts to work for the French Government, as maritime civil servant. Since 2009 she works for the French Marine Protected Area Agency. As Head Officer of the French Polynesian Department, she took part and coordinated many projects in French Polynesia and especially in Marquesan Archipelago (like oceanographic campaigns, programs dedicated to conservation of the marine biodiversity and maritime cultural heritage or to education. She is part of the experts’ council for the Marquesas-World Heritage nomination and the large scale marine protected area processes. Her lectures subjects will focus on:

  • The Polynesia maritime world

  • The ocean of the land of the men – Part 1 Natural heritage

  • Part 2 Cultural heritage

Voyage 7: May 16 – May 29, 2015
Dr. Carol Ivory,
Art Historian (Ph.D., University of Washington), Professor of Fine Arts, Washington State University. Dr. Ivory’s research has focused for more than 20 years on the art, history, and culture of the Marquesas Islanders. Her research has taken her to nearly 80 museums worldwide, and to the Marquesas Islands for since 1993, including more than a dozen Aranui voyages. She is Past-President of the Pacific Arts Association and has co-curated or consulted on numerous exhibitions on the Marquesas at venues including Mission Houses Museum, Honolulu, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Her lectures and on-site talks will focus on Polynesian prehistory and “traditional” Marquesan culture, tattoo and festivals in the Marquesas Islands.

Voyage 8: June 06 – June 19, 2015
Dr. Keao NeSmith,
Ph.D., Dr. Smith was born and raised on Kaua‘i Island in Hawai‘i and has a Masters degree in Pacific Islands Studies from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and a PhD in Applied Linguistics from the University of Waikato in Hamilton, New Zealand (2012). As a part of his Masters program, Keao spent one year attending l’Université de la Polynésie française in ‘Outumaoro, Tahiti where he studied Tahitian literature and Marquesan language. Keao’s father is an American of Scottish and Welsh background and his mother is Hawaiian and Tahitian. Coming from a multi-ethnic background, Keao speaks Hawaiian and Tahitian fluently and is familiar with French, Marquesan, and New Zealand Māori. He has been an instructor of Hawaiian language at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa for 15 years where he has also taught courses on Tahitian language. In addition, Keao has spent the majority of his life involved in Polynesian cultural activities such as Hawaiian hula and Tahitian dancing, farming taro on his family’s farm in Hawai‘i, canoe paddling and stewardship of sacred traditional sites in Hawai‘i.”

Voyage 9: June 27 – July 10, 2015
Dr. Lilikala Kame’elehiwa

Voyage 10: July 18 – July 31, 2015
Mr. Tahiarii Pariente,
born in Tahiti, Tahiarii’s life was indelibly influenced growing up between Europe and Polynesia. 

By the age of 19 he had completed a degree in Science at the “Universite Francaise du Pacifique” (Tahiti). In 1999 he graduated from the “Bond University” (Australia) with a BA in Commerce. By 2003, Tahiarii returned to the Raromatai islands to be close to his people and settled in Bora Bora, dividing his time between his computer business and his cultural responsibilities.

Tahiarii follows the ancient Arioi tradition by being a practitioner and performer of the Polynesian arts, teaching younger generations to reconnect ancient with  contemporary. He participated in the  organisation of cultural events such as the internationally known “Tattoonesia festival”.

In 2007 he moved to Hawaii to further research his indigenous heritage and was accepted as a student of highly recognised navigators such as Nainoa Thompson and Onohi Paishon. 

In 2009, Tahiarii acquired a yacht captain’s license in Normandy (France) and in early 2010, he navigated the Te Matau a Maui canoe in the historic Tavaru Fleet expedition from New Zealand to Rarotonga via Tahiti practicing non instrumental way-finding. He sereved as Polynesian culture lecturer aboard the Robert C. Seamans an American reserach vessel in 2012 from Tahiti to Hawaii.

He travels today betweeen London, Paris, Auckland, Honolulu and Rarotonga continuing his research and restorations in different private collections and museums about ancient Polynesia and offers lectures to various audiences throughout Europe.

Voyage 11: August 08 – August 21, 2015
Dr. Terry Hunt
, M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the Clark Honors College and professor of anthropology at the University of Oregon. He taught for 26 years at University of Hawaii prior to re-locating to Oregon. He earned a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Hawaii, Hilo; a Master’s degree from the University of Auckland (New Zealand), and a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Washington. Dr. Hunt is an archaeologist whose research and teaching focus on historical environmental change and life on the islands of the Pacific Ocean. He has conducted archaeological research in the Pacific Islands for more than 30 years, with extensive work in the Hawaiian Islands, Fiji, Samoa, Papua New Guinea, and Easter Island (Rapa Nui). Over the past twelve years, Dr. Hunt has directed archaeological field research on Easter Island, where he and his students work on many aspects of the islands prehistoric past. His continuing research on the island addresses questions concerning the trajectory of cultural and ecological changes, including the role of the colossal statues and monuments in ancient society.

Dr. Hunt has published numerous scholarly articles on Pacific archaeology, prehistory, and linguistics. His work has been published in Science, Nature, American Scientist, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Journal of Archaeological Science, Pacific Science, Journal of the Polynesian Society, Rapa Nui Journal, and Current Anthropology, among others. He has co-edited four books, including a collection on historical ecology. In 2008 Dr. Hunt was awarded the prestigious University of Hawaii Board of Regents Medal for Excellence in Research in recognition of his innovative work on Rapa Nui. In 2005, Dr. Hunt won the University of Hawaii Regents’ Medal for Excellence in Teaching. Dr. Hunt’s recent book (The Statues that Walked: Unraveling the Mystery of Easter Island, Free Press, New York, 2011) co-authored with Carl Lipo, revisits the dramatic story of Rapa Nui’s prehistory. The book won the Society for American Archaeology’s book of the year award, 2011, in the public audience category. Dr. Hunt’s research was the focus of a National Geographic Magazine cover story (July, 2012) and a full-length Nova-National Geographic TV documentary that aired in November 2012.

Voyage 12: August 29 – September 11, 2015
Ms. Victoria Wichman, Archaeology Collections Manager at the Bishop Museum in Honolulu, Hawaii.  She also works with nonprofit Native Hawaiian cultural heritage preservation groups, and has on-going archaeological and cultural heritage projects.  For more than 20 years, Wichman has actively documented and perpetuated today’s Polynesian traditional practices that stem from a unique cultural history.  As an archaeologist, she has participated in various projects in the Marquesas, Society Islands, New Zealand, Easter Island, and her home of Hawaii.  Her interests include:   ethno-archaeozoology, conservation of ancient cultural sites and traditional material culture, historic preservation practices and traditional Polynesian voyaging.   Together with her husband, Wichman has sailed extensively throughout Polynesia including the northern Marquesas, New Zealand, Tahiti, Society Islands, Tuamotu atolls, and Hawaii.  Several of these voyages involved safeguarding traditional voyaging canoes such as Hokulea.  Her lectures and on-site talks focus on the archaeology and material culture of the Marquesas, as well as traditional Polynesian voyaging. 

Voyage 13:September 19 – October 02, 2015
Gislain Housel,

Voyage 14 October 10 – October 23, 2015
Dr. Sidsel Millerstrom,
Anthropologist, University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Millerstrom will inform our passengers on origin and migration patterns of the Polynesians and their early settlement and life in the Marquesas. She has worked in all the islands since 1984 and has discovered and recorded numerous tiki sculptures and more than 7,000 ancient petroglyphs (rock carvings). She will also talk about prehistoric architectue, material culture and tattooing. Dr. Millerstrom’s work has appeared in various scholarly and popular journals.

Voyage 15 October 31 – November 13, 2015

Voyage 16 November 21 – December 04, 2015
J.C. Teriieroo

Voyage 17 December 12 – December 26, 2015
Mr Stephane Martin, Born in 1956, Judge, National Audit Office. Following his studies at the Paris Institute of Policital Science and the National Administration School (ENA), Stéphane Martin was appointed to the National Audit office in 1982, and was then promoted to Public Auditor in 1986 and Senior Adviser in September 2000.

 

Guest Lecturers on Board Aranui Cruises 2014

(Subject to Change without notice)

Voyage 1 January 11 – January 24, 2014

Yohan Boult

Voyage 2 February 01 – February 14, 2014

Pierre Blanchard

Voyage 3 February 22 – March 07, 2014

Tahiari Pariente

Voyage 4 March 15 – March 28, 2014

Taraua Devatine

Voyage 5 April 05 – April 18, 2014

Ben Teikiehuupoko,

 

Voyage 6 April 26 – May 09, 2014

Dr. Philip Bruner, Associate Professor ofBiology at BYU, Hawaii. Author of various technical papers on birds. Conducted research trips ranging in time from several months to a year in all of the Society Islands, Marquesas Islands, Austral Islands, Mangareva, pitcairn Islands, and Tuamotu atolls. Also conducted research in Micronesia, Line Islands, Samoa, Fiji Islands, Rapa Nui and Diego Garcia Atoll in the Indian Ocean.

Voyage 7 May 17 – May 30, 2014

Dr. Jillian Swift, A fifth-year Ph.D. candidate in archaeology at the University of California, Berkeley. Her archaeological fieldwork has taken her across the globe to Egypt, Japan, Hawaii, and most recently Mangareva. She has previously conducted research at the American Museum of Natural History on the fishhook assemblage collected by archaeologist Robert Suggs in his pioneering excavations on Nuku Hiva. Her current research focuses on the analysis of prehistoric animal remains from sites throughout French Polynesia in order to gain an understanding of prehistoric Polynesian foodways and aminal husbandry, as well as the impacts of Polynesian-transported canoe animals on island landscapes.

Voyage 8 June 07 – June 20, 2014

Dr. Keao NeSmith, Ph.D., Dr. Smith was born and raised on Kaua‘i Island in Hawai‘i and has a Masters degree in Pacific Islands Studies from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and a PhD in Applied Linguistics from the University of Waikato in Hamilton, New Zealand (2012). As a part of his Masters program, Keao spent one year attending l’Université de la Polynésie française in ‘Outumaoro, Tahiti where he studied Tahitian literature and Marquesan language. Keao’s father is an American of Scottish and Welsh background and his mother is Hawaiian and Tahitian. Coming from a multi-ethnic background, Keao speaks Hawaiian and Tahitian fluently and is familiar with French, Marquesan, and New Zealand Māori. He has been an instructor of Hawaiian language at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa for 15 years where he has also taught courses on Tahitian language. In addition, Keao has spent the majority of his life involved in Polynesian cultural activities such as Hawaiian hula and Tahitian dancing, farming taro on his family’s farm in Hawai‘i, canoe paddling and stewardship of sacred traditional sites in Hawai‘i.”

Voyage 9 June 28 – July 11, 2014

Mr. Eriki Marchand

Voyage 10 July 19 – August 01, 2014

Dr. Carol Ivory, Art Historian (Ph.D., University of Washington), Professor of Fine Arts, Washington State University. Dr. Ivory’s research has focused for more than 20 years on the art, history, and culture of the Marquesas Islanders. Her research has taken her to nearly 80 museums worldwide, and to the Marquesas Islands for since 1993, including more than a dozen Aranui voyages. She is Past-President of the Pacific Arts Association and has co-curated or consulted on numerous exhibitions on the Marquesas at venues including Mission Houses Museum, Honolulu, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Her lectures and on-site talks will focus on Polynesian prehistory and “traditional” Marquesan culture, tattoo and festivals in the Marquesas Islands.

Voyage 11, August 9 – August 22, 2014

Taraua Devatine

Voyage 12 August 30 – September 12, 2014

Ms. Victoria Wichman, Archaeology Collections Manager at the Bishop Museum in Honolulu, Hawaii.  She also works with nonprofit Native Hawaiian cultural heritage preservation groups, and has on-going archaeological and cultural heritage projects.  For more than 20 years, Wichman has actively documented and perpetuated today’s Polynesian traditional practices that stem from a unique cultural history.  As an archaeologist, she has participated in various projects in the Marquesas, Society Islands, New Zealand, Easter Island, and her home of Hawaii.  Her interests include:   ethno-archaeozoology, conservation of ancient cultural sites and traditional material culture, historic preservation practices and traditional Polynesian voyaging.   Together with her husband, Wichman has sailed extensively throughout Polynesia including the northern Marquesas, New Zealand, Tahiti, Society Islands, Tuamotu atolls, and Hawaii.  Several of these voyages involved safeguarding traditional voyaging canoes such as Hokulea.  Her lectures and on-site talks focus on the archaeology and material culture of the Marquesas, as well as traditional Polynesian voyaging. 

Voyage 13 September 20 – October 3, 2014

Ghisland Houzel

Voyage 14 October 11 – October 24,2014

Dr. Meredith Wilson, Meredith Wilson is an archaeologist who specialises in the documentation, analysis and management of Pacific rock art sites and cultural landscapes.  She completed her PhD research at the Australian National University in 2002, which involved understanding the rock art of Vanuatu within broader models of settlement and colonisation in the Pacific region.  Meredith has a long relationship with particular communities in Vanuatu where she has worked closely with the Vanuatu National Museum and Cultural Centre.  Between 2004 and 2008, Meredith was the principal coordinator of the first World Heritage Nomination submitted by the Republic of Vanuatu, which was for Chief Roi Mata’s Domain, a cultural landscape under traditional ownership and management.  She has a keen interest in the long-term development of World Heritage areas in the Pacific, and the role of Indigenous communities in the ongoing management of their living heritage.  This interest extends to the Marquesas Islands which, in 2010, were entered onto France’s ‘Tentative List’ of sites, indicating an intention to proceed with a World Heritage nomination for this island group in the future.  Meredith has undertaken archaeological and heritage management work at locations across Australia, including the Blue Mountains, Willandra Lakes, Kakadu National Park and Namadgi National Park.  She has lectured in cultural heritage at the University of Canberra, and has worked on several consulting projects as an Associate of Stepwise Heritage and Tourism Pty Ltd.

Voyage 15 November 01 – November 14, 2014

Dr. Sidsel Millerstrom, Anthropologist, University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Millerstrom will inform our passengers on origin and migration patterns of the Polynesians and their early settlement and life in the Marquesas. She has worked in all the islands since 1984 and has discovered and recorded numerous tiki sculptures and more than 7,000 ancient petroglyphs (rock carvings). She will also talk about prehistoric architectue, material culture and tattooing. Dr. Millerstrom’s work has appeared in various scholarly and popular journals.

Voyage 16 November 22 – December 05, 2014

Mr. Michael Koch studied Oceanic Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Hamburg. He wrote his dissertation about life and changes in the Marquesas between 1925 and 1985. Michael spent one and a half years on the islands between 1985 and 1987. He learnt the language and visited all the islands. In 1995, he visited the islands with a German painter, Bernd Zimmer and prepared together an illustrated re-edition of Melville’s famous Typee. Michael works as an exhibition designer for various museums in Europe. He will tell about Polynesian European contact in the times since the Europeans coming to the islands as artists and scientists, colonials, missionaries, beachcombers, and other who visited the islands, livered there and created with their images, stories, letters and influence the myth of the islands.

Voyage 17 December 13 – December 26, 2014

Pascal Erehl & Sophie Durion

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